Maintaining Me Week 6 >>>

Resilience

Welcome to Week 6 of Maintaining Me where the focus is on Resilience.

Hopefully Week 5 went well and you gained some useful advice that you can carry forward help you become more financially healthy.

For Week 6 you’re challenged to make a positive change to your diet which you’ll maintain every day across the next seven days and into the future. Hopefully your physical activity, nutrition, mental health and intellectual health habits are all becoming more automatic and part of your daily routine.

As already mentioned, the focus this week is on resilience. It’s connected with mental health but is specifically about our ability to positively adapt when we experience adversity. Don’t worry if you feel you’re not very resilient at the moment or feel you don’t cope very well with stress, resilience is a skill you can develop.

Resilience is the psychological quality that allows some people to be knocked down by the adversities of life and come back at least as strong as before. Rather than letting difficulties, traumatic events, or failure overcome them and drain their resolve, highly resilient people find a way to change course, emotionally heal, and continue moving toward their goals. Psychologists have identified some of the factors that appear to make a person more resilient, such as a positive attitude, optimism, the ability to regulate emotions, and the ability to see failure as a form of helpful feedback.

For this week, you’re challenged to commit to attending an online talk on Resilience with Linda Breathnach on Thursday 20th at 1pm for 40 minutes.  

 

The three secrets of resilient people.

To most people in the field, resilience research is a calling, an academic interest or maybe even just a buzzword. For resilient expert Lucy Hone, it turned out to be an essential survival skill. In this powerful and personal 16 minute talk, she shares the three strategies that got her through an unimaginable tragedy and—in doing so—offers profound insights on how to find meaning in loss.

From stress to resilience.

Facing stress in our lives is an integral component of being more resilient, says Raphael Rose. In his research for NASA, Raphael finds that accepting and even welcoming stress helps us become more resilient, leading to a more meaningful, joyful, and socially connected life. Clinical Psychologist This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.

IMPORTANT: It’s always advisable to check with your GP before starting any new fitness activities. Depending on your fitness levels you may need to start slowly. Please take care and avoid injuries.

Remember to always check that any advice you come across online or in podcasts or books comes from qualified reputable sources before you follow it. Just because it’s online or in print doesn’t mean it’s true.

Podcasts you might find useful:

Being Well Podcast

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In the first episode of Season 2 of the Being Well Podcast, Dr. Rick Hanson starts a series on Resilience by explaining the importance of Resilience and HOW we can begin to grow this key strength.

The Road to Resilience Podcast

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Stories and insights to help you thrive in a challenging world. From fighting burnout and trauma, to building resilient families and communities, we explore what’s possible when science meets the human spirit. Powered by the best experts in the world.

The Positive Psychology Podcast

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The science of the good life, huh? Sorry this is not about booze, sex and rock n’roll (or whatever is en vogue right now). In fact we talk about a lot of things that tree huggers would love: appreciation of beauty, gratitude, positive emotions, relationships and well, love. However we, that is positive psychologists and positive psychology practitioners buried ourselves in books, set out to experiment and then write it all up in a writing style that is about as exciting to read as watching an avocado turn brown. And that’s the problem: if you are not an academic you probably want a little bit more excitement, than pages and pages of densely written journals can provide. Even if you are an academic, who has time to read all the interesting stuff out there anyways? So in an effort to save your eyes taking on a comically rectangular shape the positive psychology podcast brings the science of the good life to your earbuds. It’s not all treehugger style though; sometimes we might get quite serious, for example when exploring things like post-traumatic growth or positive parenting. Subscribe if you want to benefit from the scientific insights into happiness and meaning while you are on the go. Let me know where you are while you are listening to this. If you like it review it, because that’s the only way other people can find it too.